Debunked! – Japanese Week 3

As I mentioned at the end of my first week studying Japanese, learning the language can be quite intimidating. However, most of the hurdles that seem overwhelming really aren’t as bad as they seem initially. I wouldn’t say I’ve been an absolute slave to my studies, but I do feel like I’ve already come a long way. So, without further ado, I want to discuss some misconceptions I had and what I’ve actually learned so far.

#1: Learning kanji is going to be the death of me.
While it is true that there are a lot of kanji, there are tricks to learn them quickly. Radicals, for one, make guessing meanings easier, and thinking of a story for why each character means what it means or is pronounced a certain way helps cement the characters in your mind. Plus, it’s fun; the satisfaction of being able to write such beautiful characters is a very strong motivator to keep going.

Additionally, when I first saw how many kanji characters there are, part of me very irrationally thought that I may as well learn Chinese first. That is a terrible idea for so many reasons!

If you want to learn Japanese, instead of viewing the language as one difficulty after another, think of it as an enjoyable journey that can last for as long as you want it to. It’s only overwhelming if you approach it with that attitude. It’s really not that different from any other language.

#2: There are no spaces between the words. I’ll never be able to read Japanese!
Spaces aren’t necessary in Japanese. Once you have built up your vocabulary, you will be able to differentiate words from one another. For instance, if the sentence ends with the hiragana character for “ka,” it’s probably a question. The different scripts make reading much easier. Practicing reading and writing with no spaces is extraordinarily beneficial for learners, too. Without the spaces, you naturally read and say words faster.

In short, if you’re worried about this when you start learning Japanese, take a deep breath. There are texts for beginners with spaces in them, but you will eventually be comfortable enough in the language that the lack of spaces won’t be an issue.

#3: I need to memorize the stroke order for everything!
While you should practice what you learn correctly, it’s not the end of the world if you write things in the wrong order. As long as you make your horizontal strokes from left-to-right and your vertical strokes from top-to-bottom, it will probably be legible, and that’s the whole point of writing, isn’t it? If you need to look up the meaning of a word you’ve never seen before, or if you have forgotten what a word means, follow the basic guidelines for stroke order and you will probably be able to find it, though it might take a while.

Last weekend, hubby wrote me a note in Japanese that I tried (and failed) to translate (because I don’t have a big enough vocabulary and thus struggled to find the ends of words and his translation was flawed to begin with). However, I was able to find every single kanji character using kanji recognizer. If I’ve been studying for 3 weeks and can find the characters I need, so can you.

#4: Typing in Japanese is insanely difficult. I’m never doing it.
Actually, it’s not that bad. When I had my first personal victory of being able to write sayonara, arigato, and kon’nichiwa in hiragana, I added the Japanese keyboard on my cellphone and texted a friend all those words. Now, as I learn words, I text my hubby and then ask him if he understood what I sent. My experiences, obviously, are pretty minimal, but it is much more intuitive than I thought it would be.

If you don’t know how it works, here’s what you do: you type in everything using your regular English alphabet. You select the correct hiragana for what you are typing as you go along. Then, you select the appropriate kanji when it populates. So, for instance, you would type in ko-n-ni-chi-ha and select the correct hiragana after every syllable. ( sometimes changes from the “ha” sound to the “wa” sound and I learned it that way, so that’s what I’m sticking with.) Kon’nichiwa is typically written in hiragana, so no kanji is necessary. If the process still doesn’t make sense, watch this video.

#5: People are probably going to judge you if you are learning Japanese and like anime/manga.
Does the term “weeaboo” ring a bell? I’ve been waiting for the hate comments, but I haven’t gotten a single one.

For the most part, I’ve actually found that people will support you in your studies and respect your efforts since the language is so complicated, regardless of your motivation to do so. While attempting to learn Japanese from anime/manga exclusively is not a good idea, there’s nothing wrong with supplementing your studies with your favorite series. Most educational resources encourage it!

I, personally, see nothing wrong in wanting to learn Japanese specifically for anime/manga. Why? Because a lot of people learn a little bit of another language specifically for a trip or because they have to for school and then they forget everything they learned afterward. How is learning French so that you can take selfies in Paris any less superficial than learning Japanese to deepen your appreciate for something you actually care about? If you are going to enjoy anime/manga for the rest of your life, then by all means, learn Japanese for that reason and make yourself happy. Just don’t assume you’re an expert on Japanese culture because you watch a lot of anime.

Sailor Moon & Hiragana – Japanese Week 2

I feel so accomplished. This week, all of my hours spent on Memrise and DuoLingo paid off. Now that I can recognize a good portion of hiragana, I can sound out words by myself and guess how they should be pronounced. It might seem like a very small milestone, but I am now able to spell kon’nichiwa, arigato, sayonara, and a few other real Japanese words in hiragana. When I realized that, I went back to DuoLingo for comparison’s sake and was able to look at the hiragana for a few basic words (numbers, colors, etc.) and sound them out and guess how they should be said. Granted, I still haven’t memorized the meaning of those particular words, but I still felt incredibly satisfied.

After saying a few basic phrases to my hubby, we were also able to deduce that the main problem that I am going to have learning the language is mastering my pronunciation. The major issue you will have from learning any language from an application or beginner program is that all of the words are overemphasized so that you can hear the appropriate sounds. If you try to learn to speak from that, you’re going to sound really weird. You have to listen to native speakers and match their pronunciation.

In light of my success with hiragana, I felt spurred on to assign myself a fun project for the week. I have loved Sailor Moon since I was in 4th grade, and I especially adore the theme song. Therefore, to help iron out my fundamentals, I am working on learning to sing the theme song. I also went to memorize what exactly each word means because I know I will remember the meanings if I can place them in the song.

Since I play piano and I already happen to have sheet music for the song, it will be relatively easy to practice, too.

The rest of the week I am devoting to this project, and also to nailing down all the hiragana. In addition to the apps, I have found that these two videos have been the most helpful.

I love this video because it goes through each section of the hiragana chart logically and gives you clever ways to remember what each character looks like. It also shows you what the characters look like in a variety of fonts, which is super helpful.

While this video is much more amateur than the other one in terms of audio quality, I still find it really insightful. This video tackles the hiragana in a different order. Instead of going by their position in the hiragana chart,it goes by how visually similar the characters are. I think this helps differentiate between characters that look really similar. I also like that she writes out everything multiple times so you can see the stroke order.

Overall, I’m really pleased with my progress. I actually feel like I’m making a lot more headway than I would if I were studying in a classroom setting.

I would eventually like to be able to blog in Japanese, but I’m not sure I will ever be able to deal with the frustration that comes with typing in Japanese. We’ll see.

Matane!

Image credit: Exceel on zerochan.net.

Death Note

A name and a face – imagine if that were all you needed to kill someone.

When I watched Death Note for the first time, I didn’t think I would be like Light if I found a death note. I didn’t think I would ever be able to bring myself to kill someone, even if I could control exactly how it happened. No, I would never bring death upon an enemy (not that I have one), even if I could specify that they would die peacefully in their sleep after having a fulfilling evening with loved ones and a chance for all of them to have closure.

Now, I’m not so sure.

Justice is meant to be impartial – you do the crime, you do the time. And how does having more than one person decide your fate make the process more impartial? And even if the law is carried out as directed, that doesn’t mean the punishment is necessarily just. If a father murders a man that abused and killed his daughter, most juries would let him off easy, but the father would still go to prison and would still be a felon for the rest of his life. The reasoning is that it wasn’t for the father to decide that man’s fate. Instead of the father killing him, the court should have decided to either sentence the man to life in prison, rehabilitate the man so he can become a productive member of society upon release, or assign the death penalty. How is that more fair than the father getting revenge on his own?

Let’s change the example. Let’s say the man was a serial rapist and killer. Is it more just for a victim’s father to kill the man then?

Or let’s say the man was a terrorist and would kill many, many people if no one stopped him.

At what point do you switch from “playing God” to being a hero for taking out a public enemy? At what point does it become morally reprehensible to not kill the murderer when you can do it easily and painlessly?

Maybe your answer is different from mine. But I think Light may have had the right idea from the start.